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Monmouth U Research Focuses on Threat of Multidrug Resistant Bacteria

Written by The Two River Times. Posted in Healthy Living

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Wardha Qureshi, biology major at Monmouth University, and Dr. James P. Mack, professor of biology, have been focusing their research on some of the most problematic bacteria found in many health care facilities.

Published on January 03, 2014 with No Comments

WEST LONG BRANCH – Wardha Qureshi, biology major at Monmouth University, and Dr. James P. Mack, professor of biology, have been focusing their research on some of the most problematic bacteria found in many health care facilities.

They have been investigating the antibacterial activity of two plant essential oils, wintergreen and cinnamon, and the compound methyglyoxal (which is found in manuka honey) on methicillin resistant Staphy­lococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), Acine­to­bacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Wardha Qureshi, biology major at Monmouth University, and Dr. James P. Mack, professor of biology, have been focusing their research on some of the most problematic bacteria found in many health care facilities.

Wardha Qureshi, biology major at Monmouth University, and Dr. James P. Mack, professor of biology, have been focusing their research on some of the most problematic bacteria found in many health care facilities.

 

The research was funded by the Monmouth University Summer Research Program (SRP) in the School of Science and included contributions from two additional students Ezra Dyan (NYU), Vinit Palayekar (Carnegie Mellon University) and Dr. Albert Rojtman, Chief of Clinical Microbiology of Jersey Shore University Medical Center.

Their research demonstrated very good antibacterial activity of tested substances against the problematic bacteria in relation to the standard antibiotics used to treat these bacterial infections.

They are currently researching various ways to deliver these antibacterial substances to affected patients by compounding with lanolin or aloe vera.

Their research could offer a more cost effective alternative to commercial antibiotics using compounds that are readily available and which would benefit underserved people worldwide.

 

For more information, contact Mack at mack@monmouth.edu.

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